A thought: The path of the righteous

A thought: The path of the righteous

A few weeks ago when I was taking a walk, I passed a car with the license plate “PVB 3V5.” It dawned on me that the plate was a Christian confession that referred to Proverbs 3:5: “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding.”

At home, I went back to Proverbs. Its writer, Solomon, is often considered one of the world’s wisest men, but he was not without his faults. I’ve read his collected wisdom several times and found it a helpful resource for living as a disciple of Jesus.

Recently we have faced confrontations, differences, and harsh discord, so I thought Solomon might have something to tell us. I also sense some of this world’s angry disagreement has rubbed off on us as Christians. Even we Christians engage our hot tempers and angry words. Too often we adopt the strategy of bullies and seem to believe that the louder we yell, the truer our thought. These attitudes and strategies among Christians—among us—trouble me.

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Author: John A. Braun
Volume 108, Number 2
Issue: February 2021

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A thought: The path of the righteous

A thought: The path of the righteous

A few weeks ago when I was taking a walk, I passed a car with the license plate “PVB 3V5.” It dawned on me that the plate was a Christian confession that referred to Proverbs 3:5: “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding.”

At home, I went back to Proverbs. Its writer, Solomon, is often considered one of the world’s wisest men, but he was not without his faults. I’ve read his collected wisdom several times and found it a helpful resource for living as a disciple of Jesus.

Recently we have faced confrontations, differences, and harsh discord, so I thought Solomon might have something to tell us. I also sense some of this world’s angry disagreement has rubbed off on us as Christians. Even we Christians engage our hot tempers and angry words. Too often we adopt the strategy of bullies and seem to believe that the louder we yell, the truer our thought. These attitudes and strategies among Christians—among us—trouble me.

Want to read more? The full text of this article is available via subscription.

Author: John A. Braun
Volume 108, Number 2
Issue: February 2021

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
John Braun
Latest posts by John Braun (see all)

Facebook comments

Follow us on Facebook to comment and view